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IBEW Local 659
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Sleeping quarters for the 23 LU 659 LCTT members working on the Camp Fire in Paradise, CA.
Wright Tree Service sent 23 LU 659 LCTT members plus one GF down to Paradise to work the Camp Fire
EWEB crews on their way to help restore and rebuild the electric system in northern California.
NV Energy door knocking "Vote NO on 3"
John O'Rourke, President of NV Energy, Gilbert Baker, Mathew McEntire, Lonnie Stephenson & Liz Schul
Chris Ford, Randy Campos and Craig Daly being sworn in @ the Medford Unit Meeting
Luke Moran
Eugene Utility Career Fair
Aaron Eisele, Brandon Eddie and Chris Valentine
Kameron Foglio and a student
Sub Apprentice, Ross A. and Kevin B.
Ed Walley with SUB
Contestant Jesse Livingston @ the Western States Electrical Contest
2018 Unit Conference
Jeff Brown, Mike Scarminach, Robert Atkinson and Kathy Joy
Dan Parrish, Anthony Adkinson, Matt Eilenberger and Craig Woods
Gordon Lafer, LERC Instructor
Discussed ALEC, Janus and Right to Work
2018 Lineman's Rodeo Opening Ceremony

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STEWARD UPDATE WEEKLY 11/21/18
Posted On: Nov 21, 2018

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Wednesday November 21, 2018

In the upcoming Steward Update newsletter
By the Numbers: Who's Doing Well and Who Isn't in Today's Economy
â–  Three in 10 adults participated in the gig economy in 2017.
â–  Uber drivers are not eligible for any benefits (e.g., workers' comp, employer paid portion of social security, etc.).
â–  A survey, conducted by Ridester, has revealed that after paying vehicle costs the median hourly pay that Uber drivers receive—including tip—is $9.73.
â–  Nearly 25 percent of young adults under age 30, receive some form of financial support from someone living outside their home.
â–  Millennials are now the largest generation in the labor force. More than a third of American workers today are Millennials (adults ages 18 to 34 in 2015).
—Compiled by Ken Margolies, a longtime labor educator at Cornell’s Worker Institute.

Labor Quote
No Struggle, No Progress
"Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both."
—Frederick Douglass, social reformer, orator, abolitionist, writer, and statesman.

Labor Cartoon
Randy Glasbergen

Steward Tip
Mobilizing Your Members
Grievances that affect a group of workers offer the opportunity to mobilize members. Here are some union-building steps to use in grievance situations:
Talk to the affected workers one-on-one to gather information about the grievance. Informal one-on-one meetings enable you to talk to a worker in-depth about the issue and to explain what the union can do.
Invite the affected workers to a group meeting to get more information, and to discuss what they as a group can do with the union to solve the problem.
If your contract and your union’s practice allows for the filing of group or mass grievances, ask all of the affected workers to sign the grievance form.
In some locals it is the practice to file many individual grievances and swamp management with paperwork and grievance meetings.
When you present the grievance(s), take all of the affected workers with you to the boss’s office. The boss may know how to deal with a routine grievance, but will be less sure of himself when faced with a group of united workers.
—Excerpted from The Union Steward’s Complete Guide (2nd Edition, Updated)

Today in Labor History

November 21
Six miners striking for better working conditions under the IWW banner are killed and many wounded in the Columbine Massacre at Lafayette, Colo. Out of this struggle Colorado coal miners gained lasting union contracts - 1927
 

The 1,700-mile Alaska Highway (Alcan Highway) is completed, built during World War II on the order of President Roosevelt.  Some 11,000 troops, about one-third of them African-Americans, worked on the project, which claimed the lives of an estimated 30 men. Memorials for the veterans are scattered in spots throughout the highway, including the Black Veterans Memorial Bridge, dedicated in 1993.  It wasn’t until 1948 that the military was desegregated - 1942
 
The United Auto Workers Union strikes 92 General Motors plants in 50 cities to back up worker demands for a 30-percent raise. An estimated 200,000 workers are out - 1945
 
Staten Island and Brooklyn are linked by the new Verrazano Narrows Bridge, the longest
suspension bridge in the world at the time and still the longest in the U.S.  Joseph Farrell, an apprentice Ironworker on the project, told radio station WNYC: "The way the wind blows over this water it would blow you right off the iron. That was to me and still is the most treacherous part of this business. When the wind grabs you on the open iron, it can be very dangerous." Three workers died over the course of the 5-year project - 1964
 
The promise of telecommuting arrives when the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network—ARPANET, the beginnings of the global internet—is established when a permanent link is created between the University of California at Los Angeles and the Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, Calif. - 1969
 

A fire at the MGM Grand Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas kills 85 hotel employees and guests and sends 650 injured persons, including 14 firefighters, to the hospital. Most of the deaths and injuries were caused by smoke inhalation - 1980
 
Flight attendants celebrate the signing into law a smoking ban on all U.S. domestic flights - 1989
 
Congress approves the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), to take effect Jan. 1 of the following year - 1993
 
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act takes effect in the nation’s workplaces. It prohibits employers from requesting genetic testing or considering someone’s genetic background in hiring, firing or promotions - 2009
 

November 22
“The Uprising of the 20,000.” Some 20,000 female garment workers are on strike in New York; Judge tells arrested pickets: “You are on strike against God.” The walkout, believed to be the first major successful strike by female workers in American history, ended the following February with union contracts bringing better pay and working conditions – 1909

The district president of the American Federation of Labor and two other Caucasians are shot and killed in Bogalusa, La., as they attempt to assist an African-American organizer working to unionize African-American workers at the Great Southern Lumber Co. - 1919

President John F. Kennedy is assassinated. Generally considered a friend of labor, Kennedy a year earlier had issued Executive Order 10988, which authorized unionization and a limited form of collective bargaining rights for most federal workers (excluding the Department of Defense). Many states followed the example set by Kennedy - 1963


November 23
History’s first recorded (on papyrus) strike, by Egyptians working on public works projects for King Ramses III in the Valley of the Kings. They were protesting having gone 20 days without pay—portions of grain—and put down their tools. Exact date estimated, described as within “the sixth month of the 29th year” of Ramses’ reign—1170BC—in The Spirit of Ancient Egypt, by Ana Ruiz. Scholar John Romer adds in Ancient Lives: The Story of the Pharaoh’s Tombmakers that the strike so terrified the authorities they gave in and raised wages. Romer believes it happened a few years later, on Nov. 14, 1152 B.C.
 
Troops are dispatched to Cripple Creek, Colo., to control protests by striking coal miners - 1903
 
Mine Workers President John L. Lewis walks away from the American Federation of Labor to lead the newly-formed Committee for Industrial Organization (CIO). The CIO and the unions created under its banner organized six million industrial workers over the following decade – 1935

The first meeting between members of the newly-formed National Football League Players Association and team owners takes place in New York. Union founders included Frank Gifford, Norm Van Brocklin, Don Shula and Kyle Rote. They were asking for a minimum $5,000 salary, a requirement that their teams pay for their equipment, and a provision for the continued payment of salary to injured players. The players’ initial demands were ignored - 1956


—Compiled and edited by David Prosten. Click here to view this week's labor history.

Steward Update Weekly is brought to you by your union and Union Communication Services - Worker Institute at Cornell ILR, publisher of the Steward Update print edition newsletter, which provides union stewards with helpful information and advice. We hope the Steward Update Weekly will be a helpful tool in your important work as a steward for your union; if you have questions or suggestions on how the Weekly can be more useful, please email us at ucs@unionist.com.

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